Tag Archives: church planting

The Importance of Church Planting

Upon arriving in Uganda, I was to spend 5 months in cultural training.  Then I was to spend 6 months focusing on learning Luganda.  I did both of those things.  Next was to explore ministries and network as a way of looking for a place to minister.  I got to know various people, churches, and ministries.  What I found that fit my interest, giftings, and was a need was church planting.

Church planting is in the DNA of MTW and is included in the tagline– “Planting Churches. Transforming Communities.”  It is getting into my blood as well.  The more I look

That's me teaching at a church planting conference in Uganda

That’s me teaching at a church planting conference in Uganda

and think the more I see the need for raising up gospel centered church planters in Uganda.

Church planting is popular in church circles today and for good reason.  Christ has promised to build His church (Matthew 16:18).  Church planting is thus a wonderful way to participate in Christ’s work on earth.

What is church planting?  It is a new establishment of the gathering of the saints.  It is mostly comprised of new believers or those without a church home, not so much those from other churches.  It is a new outpost of the worshiping community.  It is a new church being started.  I am not exactly sure why it is called church planting.  My best guess because of Paul’s words in 1 Corinthians 3:6, “I planted, Apollos watered, but God gave the growth.”  Hence church planting.

There are a myriad of ideas and practices associated with church planting.  So I started reading.  A lot.  But recently I have found something that has blown my mind.  I knew it was important and one of if not the best way to evangelize.  But I didn’t know just how important.

Keller Church Planting ManualYou might be thinking, aren’t there enough churches already?  In Timothy Keller’s and J. Allen Thompson’s Church Planting Manual, they lay out some fascinating statistics that say perhaps there are not.  In 1776, 17% of the population in America were “religious adherents.”  In 1906 that number climbed to 53%.  Why?  Church planting.  From 1860-1906 there was a new church plant for every increase in population of 350.[1]

Yo.  That is amazing.  It is church planting that was the main factor in the growth of believers in America.  These stats have revitalized my pursuit of church planting in Uganda.

Many say there are enough churches in Uganda.  The population is growing as well as moving to the cities.  More healthy churches are needed.  More trained and equipped church planters are needed.  This is my ministry – discipling church planters to plant healthy churches.  Please pray for wisdom and guidance from the Lord.  Please pray for laborers; for the harvest is plentiful here in Uganda (Matthew 9:37-38).

[1] All stats taken from Keller & Thompson, Church Planting Manual, p32.

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Unwrapping Up

Our time in Kenya is coming to an end. But that didn’t stop us from unwrapping some gifts from God. We taught our last full day and then headed out to greet some people.

So what exactly have we been doing here? Why are we in Kenya teaching on church planting? Good questions. Let’s back up and look at that.

That's me teaching.

That’s me teaching.


We are here in Kenya teaching at a MINTS center. MINTS is an organization that provides sound reformed biblical teaching material to those areas where that kind of teaching is not available. MINTS does this in two ways.

The first way is to collect biblical classes that various people have written. They make them available for anyone to take and teach on at the various centers (with the writer’s permission). This makes what to teach simpler for a lot of teachers.

The second way is to empower local believers to run centers. Running a center takes minimal resources because they don’t have buildings but ‘borrow’ existing buildings for a week or two at a time. The local who runs the center helps recruit students and teachers to come for the selected times during the year. I have been to several now and its simplicity is beautiful and of course easily reproducible.

MINTS believes in the locals and the quality so much that they grant degrees for those completing the work. This makes it very attractive to local pastors. It also makes getting good teaching and degrees a lot more affordable. Because the centers only run a few weeks at a time it also helps answer some of the issues faced with residential schooling.

Visiting with a student and his family.

Visiting with a student and his family.

Bruce teaches and works at a residential Bible college/seminary. Yet he also travels to these centers to help teach in other parts of Africa. He does this because the two models work well together. As a matter of fact Abraham is a former student of Bruce’s. Abraham graduated from Westminster Theological College (now known as Westminster Christian Institute of Uganda) and moved to his home area with the vision to bring the kind of teaching he received to local pastors.

The class we are teaching on this week is church planting. This is a topic of particular interest to me. I want to see lots of churches planted because churches are beacons of God’s glory (Ephesians 3:20). Thus to shine this light to a lost world, the best way is to plant churches where people do not know Jesus. That’s why I pray these students go back home and plant more churches with more biblical insight.

After class on Thursday, we had the opportunity to greet a student in his home and then 350 widows and single mothers gathering for a conference. It was a wonderful tour of rural Kenya. It was also a very encouraging time getting to meet with them.

First we stopped by a student’s home. Hospitality and welcoming people into your home, especially visitors, is a big deal in Africa. Some of the students have come from far away and some closer by. This student fits into the latter category.

Of course tea was offered. I am told that there are 3 tea times in England. But Abraham says that in Kenya, every time is tea time. Also chapattis were consumed. Yum. Apparently the kids outside were laughing at me. I went into the kitchen to see it and to greet the wife. Kitchens are separate from the main house in this part of Kenya (as well as much of Africa). The husband told me the kids were laughing because white people don’t go into kitchens. I was unaware. But apparently that is the perspective of white people here. Who knew?

We had heard of a widows and single mothers conference taking place nearby. So we decided to stop by and see it. We should have known better but ‘seeing it’ turned into speaking to, greeting, and praying for them.

This is what a room full of widows and single mothers giving a thumbs up looks like zoomed in!!!!!

This is what a room full of widows and single mothers giving a thumbs up looks like zoomed in!!!!!

As we entered the building we stood in the back. That wasn’t good enough. They escorted us to the stage to sit up there. On our way up there you would have thought I was a well-known speaker. Everyone was offering a hand to shake. But it is very important to greet visitors – especially obvious visitors from far away (we’re looking at you white skin). It was a privilege to greet so many widows.

When it was my turn to speak I butchered a greeting in the local language. I then told them that their bright smiles – and to be sure they were smiling wildly and expressing amazing joy – were a testimony to me. Being a widow or single mother is difficult for many reasons. Hence the special instructions to care for them in the Bible. Being a widow or single mother in Africa adds a lot of other challenges. So their joy despite any issues they may be facing is a testimony to me.

I also had them sing ‘Mambo Sawa Sawa’ which is a song in Swahili that we sang often at church in St. Louis. It is a simple song but says that things are already better because Jesus is on the throne. Hearing this from widows makes its meaning much more rich!

We left that time and commented on how encouraging it was. More for us than them. But Abraham said they were very glad we stopped by to greet them. Whether or not they were blessed I can’t be sure. We sure were blessed. Please pray for these women as their conference continues until Sunday. Then next August they will meet again. Amazing! I told you we got to unwrap some of God’s gifts.

Saying goodbye.  Thumbs up from our hosts and their guests (and a neighbor).  Bruce, Abraham, Kendrick, Concillia, Judith, relative, neighbor, Steven

Saying goodbye. Thumbs up from our hosts and their guests (and a neighbor). Bruce, Abraham, Kendrick, Concillia, Judith, relative, neighbor, Steven

Then came our last night and morning at Abraham’s. He and his family have been a real blessing. Judith made chapatti mayai (pronounced like ‘my eye’). That is an egg mixed into the chapatti batter and then cooked normally. It is the Kenyan version of the rollex. Since the egg is mixed into the batter perhaps it could be called a ‘rollin’. You’re welcome for that. But we had to say goodbye to this wonderful family. We will then teach for a bit and then head back to Uganda. Pray for safe journeys and that the Lord would use our time here in Kenya for His glory. Oh and this is the last dispatch. Let the jeering or cheering begin as fits.

Another picture of Abraham, Judith, and children.

Another picture of Abraham, Judith, and children.

What a cute house!!!  I love the flowers!

What a cute house!!! I love the flowers!

This is what a room full of widows and single mothers giving a thumbs up looks like!!!!!

This is what a room full of widows and single mothers giving a thumbs up looks like!!!!!

It's a crane convention.

It’s a crane convention.

We met at a primary school during vacation.  The teachers, as usual, work during vacation to make teaching materials.  These ladies were next door to us.

We met at a primary school during vacation. The teachers, as usual, work during vacation to make teaching materials. These ladies were next door to us.

Thumbs up from our wonderful host family.

Thumbs up from our wonderful host family.

Our living quarters for our week in Kenya.  Good bye.

Our living quarters for our week in Kenya. Good bye.

What a view!!!!  God is good!

What a view!!!! God is good!

This is what a room full of widows and single mothers giving a thumbs up looks like!!!!!

This is what a room full of widows and single mothers giving a thumbs up looks like!!!!!

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